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How to Rebatch Soap in the Oven

ugly soap
They can’t all be beautiful, I guess.

I messed up a soap recently…I purchased a salad shooter and made the mistake of soaking my soap shreds before adding them to my soap. Of course, they turned to mush and looked awful in the soap. I shouldn’t have added them at all (another case of I should have gone with my gut, but didn’t). I decided it wouldn’t sell looking like that, so I’d better rebatch it. I had only had to rebatch soap once before – I used the crockpot and it got really dried out, so I wanted to try a different method. After reading through the Bramble Berry guide to rebatching, I decided to try the oven method at the bottom of the tutorial.

I had two loaves of this disaster soap, but after cubing up one loaf, I realized only one loaf would fit in my baking dish. So I did one loaf at a time. With the first loaf (3.2 pounds), I added a cup and a half of water (which is about 1/2 C per lb of soap).

This is less than the tutorial recommended, but I felt like 1 cup per pound of soap was an awful lot of water.

rebatch soap
Cubed soap ready for rebatching.

Turns out, even the amount I used was too much water. I froze the soap the next day to get it out of the mold, but it’s been sitting on the counter for three days and it’s still very soft. *sad face*

So the next day, I rebatched the second loaf using only a half cup of water total. This one turned out much better. So, here is the process, all laid out:

Rebatch Soap in the Oven Tutorial

Step 1: Preheat the oven to 200 degrees.

Step 2: Cut your problem soap into cubes and place them in a baking dish.

Final result.
Final result. It looks like hot process, huh?
Step 3: Add 2.5 Tablespoons of water per pound of soap.

Step 4: Cover your dish with foil.

Step 5: Bake soap for 35 minutes, stir and bake an additional 35 minutes. Stir again.

Step 6: At this point the soap is going to be the texture of hot process soap. You are now ready to add color and/or fragrance to your soap and scoop it into your mold. Be prepared to work quickly. Just like hot process soap, rebatch soap likes to get firm quickly. You could add a little sodium lactate to the melted soap to keep it fluid for a little longer.

I still froze the soap the next day to get it out of the mold, and then let it sit overnight. I was able to cut it the following day with no issues. One day later, the bars are softer than a regular bar would be, but I know it will harden up soon. The first batch…time will tell. That one might get pitched.

rebatch soap top
I added glitter for good measure. And that’s Layla (she’s being super needy and won’t let me take a photo without her).
Notes: My soap was only a few days old when I did my rebatch. That may be why I only needed 2.5 Tablespoons of water per pound of soap. If your soap is fully cured, or even older than that, you might need more water than this. I haven’t tested it, so I don’t know for certain, but it does seem logical.

Who else hates to rebatch soap? Do you have a better method? Please, share it in the comments!